Camera Gear Artikelen

The Horseman Convertible 842 camera was made in the early 1970s. This Medium Format camera with a 62mm wide angle lens was a novelty. It equals a 32mm or even a 25mm wide angle in the 135 format! The camera remains a rarity to this day, sometimes these cameras surface on eBay or on camera shows. Judging from serial numbers on the lenses, there were less than 5,000 cameras made.

Mirrorless camera adapters article

With the modern day new mirrorless cameras like the Fuji X-T2 and the Sony A7-II, there's great fun in finding less-than-usual lenses in abandoned lens mounts, and adapt them to fit the camera of your choice.

There's a lot of adapters available for peanut prices if you want to try something exotic and this article lists a lot of options to get your lens and camera connected.

Don't forget to get a bunch of macro rings to add between camera and lens if that is your thing!

In this article I try to compile a comprehensive guide to adapting lenses to various types and brands of cameras and lens mounts. As you will have found out by now (or you wouldn't be reading this article), most camera manufacturers used their own, proprietary lens mounts to make sure that once a customer (that means you) bought into a system, they'd be hooked forever.

The Ricoh GXR is a remarkable camera. It is built by a unique concept, where changing a lens means you also change the sensor.

Ricoh Launched the GXR in november 2009. It was designed to be a Compact System Camera (CSC), which means it is a small camera and it featured exchangeable lenses. But Ricoh decided to not just manufacture exchangeable lenses, but incorporate lens and sensor in a single unit, called a 'lensor'. The idea behind this was simple: different lenses could benefit from different sensor sizes.

The A12 GXR Mount lensor isn't quite a lensor, in that it has no lens incorporated! Instead it has a Leica M mount in the unit that also houses an APS-C 12MP sensor.

Maybe you're old enough to remember what it felt like to have a stack of prints, negatives or slides in your hand as the result of your photographic labour. Or maybe you're less of a fossil than that and your results reside in a folder on a hard drive, on or off site. In either case, as a (semi) professional photographer you need to have a filing system that will allow you to locate a file, negative or print quickly and have some details on lens used, camera used, film or (digital) processing used, etc. so you can re-create an iconic image with some consistency. 

This blog post shows you my MO when it comes to keeping tabs on what I did and where the results are stored.

After I discovered online that the 1940's American Perfex Deluxe rangefinder was also available in a version with a Wollensak lens in a 38mm screw mount, I decided to buy one and find out if it would fit a Leica.

Only when it arrived I found out that the focussing unit of the Perfex is on the body, not on the lens. A bit like a really unsophisticated Contax focusing system. So much for easily adapting the lens for Leica, I thought. The camera sat on a shelf for quite some time. It wasn't a feat of engineering either, using it was like photographing with a brick, both in ergonomics and in results. I didn't even try, it was too obvious.

So you've been looking for this very special lens that will make your Nikon / Minolta / Canon / Zeiss-Ikon (choose your brand) contemporary-correct camera kit complete, but the only specimen you can find has a bent filter rim? Despair not! For today I'm offering a simple DIY tool to straighten filter rims, provided they are made from metal that can bend back into shape.

Konica has always been a company with its own master plan on photography. The release of the Hexar in 1993 came as a suprise to the photography community. The Hexar was shockingly good, despite its quirky button use to set the cameras functions with. It was hailed as the viable alternative for a Leica M6, and AutoFocus too!

 

Johan Niels Kuiper, fotograaf in Assen, Drenthe - Konica Hexar AF 

 

 

In this digital day and era, I feel safe to say the Hexar is the best compact film camera ever produced. Full stop. What, you don't believe me?

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